what do they call it ? adverse ?

So we are under snow and without water again, pipes frozen all the way up the hill but water not even coming in from the local water scheme (thank goodness for neighbours and their goodness), should really organize a freeze-proof rain water collection tank at the top if winters are to be this way inclined from now on. Had to cancel baking for this week but Christmas market going ahead as planned in Knockvicar Cleen Hall, worth a visit, if the roads are good.

Have filled the coconuts of last winter and some new ones on their bamboo poles with collected fat and leftover flour and crumbs, and hung large pieces of fat that the butcher gave us last week in recycled citrus fruit netting, all very popular. The hawthorn tree is still covered in fruit and the blackbirds and thrushes are feasting on them. No sun today but the little birds with colourful feathers a joy to watch. Rather cold in the house but we are layered on and hatted and hot beveraged.

The kefir (how did we ever live without this?) takes longer to make in this temperature, our fermentation corner had to be relocated to the bathroom as the kitchen is too cold, but so lovely to still get enough milk for this every day (and a potful of rice pudding for the children every week, with cinnamon and cardamom and lemon rind). Recommended reading Wild Fermentation by Sandor Elix Katz, and just ask me if you would like a gift of some Kefir grain to start making your own, it’s good to have something to share.

And with all this white around covering everything aren’t we so lucky to also still be getting a couple, or an Irish couple (3 or more), of eggs every day ? Stay warm.

2 comments

  1. Thanks for the great tip about using butchers fat in the wee citrus nets, as soon as we can get into town I will ask the butcher for some, along with the scraps that he usually gives me for my cats.
    Off to read about the wild fermentation now.
    Stay warm 🙂

    • The blue tits love it, for the others melted fat mixed with crumbs, cheese rind, flour sweepings, etc. used to fill the coconut-halves on bamboo sticks seem irrestible. Stay warm.

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